The Illinois FOP Labor Council

The Labor Council provides full union representation: negotiating and enforcing contracts, improving salaries, working conditions, and benefits for law enforcement professionals throughout Illinois. Our members are protected 24 hours a day by a staff of full-time, in-house attorneys and field representatives who have a proven track record of winning.

24 Hour Critical Incident Hotline: 877-IFOP-911



Proposed Layoffs Of Cook County Court Service Deputies Will Risk Public Safety

By Tamara Cummings, General Counsel - Wednesday, July 19, 2017

CHICAGO – The proposed layoffs of Cook County Court Service Deputies will put public safety at risk, and the Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council (ILFOP) contends the budget cuts are unnecessary because job levels in this critically understaffed area have already been slashed 11 percent over the last three years. Moreover, even though the budget shortfall is county wide, the bulk of the cuts so far have been to public safety personnel such as sheriff's police, court service deputies, corrections personnel, states attorneys and public defenders.CHICAGO – The proposed layoffs of Cook County Court Service Deputies will put public safety at risk, and the Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council (ILFOP) contends the budget cuts are unnecessary because job levels in this critically understaffed area have already been slashed 11 percent over the last three years. Moreover, even though the budget shortfall is county wide, the bulk of the cuts so far have been to public safety personnel such as sheriff's police, court service deputies, corrections personnel, states attorneys and public defenders.

"The safety of judges, jurors, witnesses and victims who appear in court on a daily basis should not be used as a bargaining chip in a local government power struggle," said ILFOP Assistant Director Shawn Roselieb. "More and more offenders are being hauled into court as we work to cleanse our streets of violence, and this is the wrong time to reduce an already understaffed court security system."
The ILFOP represents Court Service Deputies and other employees of the Cook County Sheriff's Department. Court Service Deputies provide security in the courtrooms, public areas and offices of the county's judicial centers. They also include specialty units such as civil process that serve orders of protection, warrants, levies and eviction notices; the K9 unit; and the Sheriff's Work Alternative Program (SWAP). The ILFOP is responding to Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle's assertion that a number of Court Service Deputies must be laid off to make up for the loss of revenue from the county-wide soda tax. The tax, which helps fund certain Cook County services, has been blocked by a temporary restraining order.   

The number of Cook County Court Service Deputies has dropped from 1,110 in October 2014 to 989 in July 2017. There have been no court service training academy classes since 2006, which reduces the number of eligible candidates during the increasingly rare occasions when positions are filled. These reduced numbers mean deputies must often work multiple courtrooms at once, instead of having a minimum of one per courtroom.     

"Threatening the safety of taxpayers and the lives of hard-working employees is not a good budget negotiation strategy," Roselieb said. "It's time to stop the one-upmanship and protect law-abiding Cook County citizens from potential tragedies or expensive litigation."   
The Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council is a law enforcement union representing more than 11,600 professionals in more than 514 bargaining units who work in the criminal justice system. The Labor Council negotiates and enforces contracts and  improves salaries, working conditions, and benefits for law enforcement professionals throughout Illinois. Its members include police officers who work for municipalities, universities, and elected Constitutional officials; county sheriff’s deputies, correctional and court security officers; probation officers; 911 telecommunicators; law enforcement records personnel; and some related support staff.

Bargaining Unit Leadership/ New Steward Training

By IL FOP Labor Council, Staff - Friday, July 14, 2017

Thursday, September 14, 2017- 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Jacksonville Police Training Facility
940 Hoagland Road
Jacksonville, IL 62650

Class size is limited to the first 40 participants. Please register with Chris Flynn at (217) 698-9433 or email: cflynn@fop.org Lunch will be provided.

9:00 - 11:15 a.m. (Dan Bailey and Tamara Cummings) Handling a Critical Incident

Members will learn their role in handling a critical incident, and what they should do to protect the rights of their coworkers. IL FOP LC Critical Incident Hotline 1-(877) IFOP-911

11:15 - 11:30 a.m. Break

11:30 - 12:00 p.m. (Jay Johnson) Workers' Comp Issues

Members will learn the rights of injured workers, tailored to the unique circumstances of those working in the law enforcement field. Instruction will include the importance of giving proper and timely notice of work accidents, the importance of injured employees to treat with their own physicians rather than physicians chosen by the department, the unique protections under PEDA and the Public Safety Employees Benefit Act, the rights to compensation for permanent injuries (and what permanent means), and protections offered to injured employees who cannot return to their normal job.

12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Lunch provided on-site

1:00 - 2:45 p.m. (Mike Powell and Gary Bailey) Collective Bargaining

Attendees will receive instruction on preparation for negotiations/ reaching tentative agreement or impasse/mediation and arbitration.

2:45 - 3:00 p.m. Break

3:00 - 4:30 p.m. (Jerry Lieb and Dave Nixon) Fraternal vs Labor (New Steward Training)

Members will learn the distinction between IL FOP State Lodge vs IL FOP Labor Council and the importance of each. Instruction will cover the following topics: running meetings, developing by-laws, grievance preparation, and duties for representing your membership and the importance of each.

We're Your Union

By David Wickster, Executive Director - Thursday, April 04, 2013

The Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council is a Law Enforcement Union representing some 10,000 plus professionals who work in the Criminal Justice Arena and are granted their collective bargaining rights under the Illinois Labor Relations Act.  Our members are Municipal Police Officers, County Sheriff’s Deputies, Police Officers who work for Elected Constitutional Officers, University Police Officers, County Correctional Officers, Court Security Officers, Probation Officers, 911 Telecommunicators, Records Personnel and some related Support Staff. 

Outside the City of Chicago the Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council represents more law enforcement professionals than any other union in Illinois with over 490 bargaining units.  Our largest units boast membership numbers in the hundreds, while some of our smallest units consist of only four to five members.  We have a presence in some of the most remote parts of the State, such as the Cities of Beardstown and Metropolis and the Counties of Washington and Union, as well as some of the densest regions, such as the Chicagoland Area and Cook County.

 

Experienced Labor Professionals

The Illinois Fraternal Order of Police Labor Council prides itself in representing its membership in the specialized field of public sector/public safety labor representation.  With a full time staff of 13 attorneys and 13 field representatives, all responsible for negotiating contracts and representing membership, the FOP Labor Council has 208 years of combined Law Enforcement experience and 475 years of labor experience, collectively. 

With offices in Western Springs (north) and Springfield (south), the FOP Labor Council is the only union who can meet the demands of law enforcement professionals 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with 10 administrative staff members and a 24 hour emergency hotline.

A Long and Strong Tradition

The Illinois FOP Labor Council was originally framed as a “Labor Committee” of the Illinois FOP State Lodge back in 1983 in anticipation of police officers gaining the right to collectively bargain.  In 1984 collective begging became collective bargaining with the inclusion of police officers and firefighters under the Illinois Labor Relations Act.

With the onslaught of police officers seeking rights under collective bargaining the Labor Committee quickly evolved into an independent entity known today as the FOP Labor Council.  Several active law enforcement officers from across the state left the security of their employment to help form the Labor Council.  Their dedication and commitment established the backbone of the Labor Council which today employs labor experts with experience from across a broad range of the labor relations spectrum.