The Illinois FOP Labor Council

The Labor Council provides full union representation: negotiating and enforcing contracts, improving salaries, working conditions, and benefits for law enforcement professionals throughout Illinois. Our members are protected 24 hours a day by a staff of full-time, in-house attorneys and field representatives who have a proven track record of winning.

24 Hour Critical Incident Hotline: 877-IFOP-911

By Keith Turney, Field Representative - Friday, January 12, 2018

 

Negotiations for Will County Probation Officers and Clerical Employees was laborious to say the least.  Bargaining team members met over the course of nearly a year in an attempt to hammer out an agreement.  Negotiations at times got contentious as our bargaining team members fought for every potential advantage at the bargaining table. Ultimately, we struck a deal that was monumentally beneficial for Labor Council Members.

For the first time, probation officers and clerical will be able to receive overtime pay rather than compensatory time.  (capped at twenty hours annually). Starting and ending times were formalized in the contract. Pay ranges were expanded and 22% pay raises will occur over the life of the five year agreement. A Bilingual Stipend of $500.00 annually will be provided to Spanish speaking officers.  All members received a $500.00 signing bonus.

Field Representative Keith Turney was quoted as saying; “The bargaining team of Dan Raub, Delores Brittain, Peter Bullock; led by Chief Steward Tom Corsi put together a great package for their members. They were a pleasure to work with because they worked so diligently on the contract”.   



By Jay Titus, Field Representitive - Friday, January 12, 2018

 

The Village of Coal Valley have a new three year contract. The team secured a wage increase in each of the three years, increased the wage percentage difference between Officers and Sergeants, added compensatory time and FTO pay.  The team was also able to add criticial languange pertaining to 10-hour shifts, drug and alcohol testing, sick leave, vacation time and training.  The unit was represented by Clint Whitney and Tim Krebe who did a great job!  They were assisted by Field Representative Jay Titus and Attorney Gary Bailey.

 



By John Roche, Attorney - Friday, January 12, 2018

 

The Bargaining Team, in exchange for modest wage proposals, was able to secure locked in insurance for a period of time that significantly extended past the duration of the collective bargaining agreement.



By Keith Turney, Field Representative - Friday, January 12, 2018

 

The Illinois FOP Labor Council, representing Livingston County Correctional Officers, Court Security Offices and Secretarial Staff entered into negotiations with two open insurance grievances that accused the employer of unilaterally changing insurance benefits without negotiating such changes.  After exchanging proposals on day one there were some 40 outstanding issues that both sides needed to resolve. Needless to say; there were ill feelings on each side of the bargaining table and emotions were tense.

The County had adopted a rather unusual stance, taking into consideration that they were under no financial hardship; cuts, cuts and more cuts. ILFOPLC Representative Keith Turney was quoted as saying: “To the union’s advantage, we had a seasoned bargaining team who were well up to the challenge of what proved to be a long and arduous negotiations. Jason Durham, Kyle Fever, Don Niles, Brian McGrath and Beth Limberg worked tirelessly at the table. The County on the other hand had a crew of representatives that we had little experience working with.  It was tough going until we eventually gained the trust of the other side. Once that trust was established, (after nearly 12 months of continuous negotiations) we easily reached a deal.” 

And a good deal it was!  An accelerated grievance procedure was put into place.  Time due can now be taken in one-hour increments, and a medical allowance which was often underutilized was converted into a yearly stipend for all current employees. In exchange for increases to the percent of insurance premium paid and the dropping of grievances, a twenty-five step pay plan was condensed to six steps; after which a 2% per year was applied to the base for the last two years of the contract. Dramatic and well deserved wage increases will be realized by members throughout the life of the contract.



By Keith Turney, Field Representative - Friday, January 12, 2018

 

The ILFOP Labor Council represents Probation Officers, Corrections, Court Security & Clerical, and Deputies in Livingston County.  The County unilaterally changed insurance benefits for all Labor Council Units prior to negotiations in what could only be assumed as an overt act of war!  Needless to say; to barrow a line from the movie “The Godfather” we went to the mattresses.   Negotiations were brutal as the union fought several grievances and attempted to bargain in good faith with the employer. Probation Officers who lacked Interest Arbitration fought hard to the bitter end.  Corrections battled for over twelve months until they finally reached a fair and equitable deal. Livingston County Deputies strategized, based upon what they were seeing, and came at the employer with a no nonsense approach. Backed with statistical comparables and months of homework they were focused and determined to not be bullied.  They came to the table ready for the fight, knowing that anything less would not only put them at a disadvantage, but drag out negotiations – needlessly wasting county money and resources. 

It wasn’t long before a Federal Mediator needed to be called in.  There was some serious bargaining going on and no subterfuge on the part of the employer was to be tolerated. A deal came rather quickly with this approach, but as any good negotiator will tell you; the devil is in the details.  The promises made by the employer’s representative were adequate, but ultimately lacked substance.  Draft after draft were exchanged between the union and the employer.  Finally, there was a realization, that not only were we not kidding around, but were being fair and honest.

Ultimately a good deal was struck.  The grievance procedure was streamlined, a new vacation draw procedure was enacted, leave time was converted to one-hour increments and a mutual flex time provision for detectives was implemented.  Medical and clothing allowances that were often times underutilized was converted to an annual lump sum payment for all current and future members.  A new modified duty policy was agreed to. Knowing that they were at the top of their comps the bargaining team took a long range approach to wages. In exchange for increased percentages on insurance premiums and settlement of insurance grievances, Deputies demanded a $3000.00 signing bonus on top of a 3% base wage adjustment over the life of the contract. 

ILFOPLC Field Representative Keith Turney was quoted as saying; “The team of Ryan Baum, Jeff Hamilton, Leland Brooke, Sam Fitzpatrick and Zach Brenning were hard core and no nonsense!  Not only did they do their union members right, they set up the tee for the next set of negotiations.  They did it right; they addressed immediate concerns but never lost sight of the big picture.  And their professional values to preserve their work environment for future generations was commendable.”            



By Jerry Lieb, Field Supervisor - Thursday, January 11, 2018

 

The bargaining team did an excellent job negotiating a new agreement for their membership which managed to extend through the year 2023 impasse resolution which they do not have by law.  In addition to numerous clerical changes they added payment for both a health club and shooting range to their agreement.  The supervisor's pay was increased by $.20 an hour added to  base and with a market adjustment to their base achieved a 7% increase over the three years of the agreement.  The bargaining team of Chairman John Ervin and Steve Traubitz did an excellent job for their membership.  Field Supervisor Jerry Lieb assisted the team during the negotiations.